It Takes a Village…?

…At least that is what they say. Anyway, I am always happy and proud to share support (links or ?) of others who are passionate about their craft!

Here are a few folks who have linked or promoted my website and now its my chance to pay it forward. Thanks everyone!!

Been having fun chatting regularly with a few fellow music bloggers. Mixolydianblog for all things music focusing on composition, ethnomusicology and of course a love of the GUITAR! Heavy Metal Overload   A great read for all types of music, as well as, Heavy Metal. Last but not least Zombiemisntrel another comprehensive music blog also leaning towards rock and metal!

A wedding photographer from the Philippines shared my blog post  Ten Tips for Planning Wedding Music

An arts magazine called Yareah shared my blog Dodecaphonic Sudoku

Right to Bitch a new blog to me, shared John Bonham 32 Years Missed Check out his blog regarding Bonham’s influence on him as a young drummer. Funny guy!

A local San Diego photographer Nathan Petty …thanks for keeping in touch!

Sharing is caring! If I missed anyone feel free to remind me…I’m always glad to network with like minded people out there working hard at their creative endeavors!

Mike

Dodecaphonic Sudoku

Wow! Here is a serious brain teaser for music geeks.

For the uninitiated dodecaphony is a music term relating to the twelve notes we use in Western music… the basis of my blog 12 Notes & The Truth!

In the 1920’s Composer Arnold Schoenberg set out to compose music through a process that obliterated the systems we are/were used to hearing. Serialism is the name of the movement in which all twelve notes must be used before any are repeated. Creating no key centers in the composition and lack of melody and harmony as we are used to hearing.

The following puzzle is a take on dedecaphony. A Sudoku matrix set up where each note can only be used only once, horizontally, diagonally and in each of the 12 boxes of the matrix.

In essence there is no difference than converting a regular Sudoku puzzle to be 12 x 12 instead of the traditional 9 x 9. Where the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 are replaced by the 12 notes in our chromatic scale A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G, Ab. Once completed, a composer would take any of the rows horizontal or vertical and compose using those notes.
Complete Serialism proved to be a little restrictive and many composers have used this technique as a guideline rather than a steadfast rule.

Here is the puzzle. I haven’t worked it so cant guarantee its solve-ability. Have fun if you are so inclined!

This music wasn’t written to be scary or Halloween-ish although not a bad way to transition into October with this piece.

This is real music listen with open ears and an open mind!

Arnold Schoenberg’s, “Piano Concerto op. 42 (Excerpt)”

Enjoy!