Music to Relax, Spring has Sprung, Copland “Appalachian Spring”

SpringWelcome to Spring everyone!

I know for those of you back East it was an extremely rough winter. In San Diego not so much we had our bits of rain and frost, but, also plenty of 70 degree plus days, as well.

(Shameless plug, “Sunny & 70“)

Thought I would honor the first day of Spring with Aaron Copland’s famous piece, “Appalachian Spring.” Beautiful melodies, lush orchestration and a pastoral setting of Americana, including his use of the Shaker tune, “A Gift to be Simple.”

Copland was a very innovative composer of the 20th Century, however, became known for and remembered much more for his ‘romanticized,’ settings of Americana which only accounted for a brief period of his compositional output. If you are interested try the following link for a different look into Copland’s work.

Who’s ready for summer?

Enjoy!

Dodecaphonic Sudoku

Wow! Here is a serious brain teaser for music geeks.

For the uninitiated dodecaphony is a music term relating to the twelve notes we use in Western music… the basis of my blog 12 Notes & The Truth!

In the 1920’s Composer Arnold Schoenberg set out to compose music through a process that obliterated the systems we are/were used to hearing. Serialism is the name of the movement in which all twelve notes must be used before any are repeated. Creating no key centers in the composition and lack of melody and harmony as we are used to hearing.

The following puzzle is a take on dedecaphony. A Sudoku matrix set up where each note can only be used only once, horizontally, diagonally and in each of the 12 boxes of the matrix.

In essence there is no difference than converting a regular Sudoku puzzle to be 12 x 12 instead of the traditional 9 x 9. Where the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 are replaced by the 12 notes in our chromatic scale A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G, Ab. Once completed, a composer would take any of the rows horizontal or vertical and compose using those notes.
Complete Serialism proved to be a little restrictive and many composers have used this technique as a guideline rather than a steadfast rule.

Here is the puzzle. I haven’t worked it so cant guarantee its solve-ability. Have fun if you are so inclined!

This music wasn’t written to be scary or Halloween-ish although not a bad way to transition into October with this piece.

This is real music listen with open ears and an open mind!

Arnold Schoenberg’s, “Piano Concerto op. 42 (Excerpt)”

Enjoy!